Sunday, March 19, 2017

Why ADA laws matter

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA
became law in 1990. The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else.



Americans with Disabilities are a huge portion of our population. Notably, they include American Disabled VETERANS who have served our country most of which now want to work in the workforce.  

What does it say about an American door manufacturer who avoids complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act?  There seem to be only two possibilities - ignorance or intention.  Because I pointed out the ADA violations I know it isn't because of ignorance (anymore).  And we already discovered there is a "profit" motive (pre-cut door frames).

Accessibility requirements with regard to doors are described here and here and here.  Obviously, anybody who is in the business of manufacturing commercial doors for sale in America MUST comply with ADA regulations.  

This fact seems to have gone over the head of The Sliding Door Company.  They apparently regularly violate ADA regulations to save money.  I have described a couple of the problems here and here but there are also ADA violation issues with regard to their threshold ramps which I will describe in a future blog post.  Their product catalogs describe these products as ADA compliant so their customers have no reason to question this until a lawsuit is filed against their CUSTOMER for ADA violations.  Apparently, that's VERY easy to do.

So, door manufacturers who want to keep their customers and who don't want to violate the law need to be diligent about ADA regulations and ensuring that their products comply COMPLETELY.  

Door manufacturers who put profit above the disabled, safety and the law need not comply.





Note: 

1) My father was a disabled veteran.  
2) I've been a technical illustrator for ADA guideline books for almost 20 years.  











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