Monday, September 14, 2015

10 THINGS EMPLOYEES DISLIKE MOST ABOUT THEIR EMPLOYERS



10 THINGS EMPLOYEES DISLIKE MOST ABOUT THEIR EMPLOYERS

1. LACK OF COMMUNICATION

The issue starts when employees avoid speaking forthright to their employers for fear of retribution. "When communication breaks down, rumors run rampant and will directly impact productivity, focus and ultimately the finances of the company."

2. UNFAIR PAY

Retail giant Wal-Mart has taken heat from all angles for paying unfair wages and benefits to its employees while reaping enormous profits. It’s a formula that raises the ire of politicians, advocates and the public, but is cheered on Wall Street.

3. NO JOB SECURITY

A substantial amount of employees have been made to feel as valuable to the company as a paper clip.

4. UNDER APPRECIATION

When an employee feels unappreciated at work, the stress it creates can have a fatal blow to the company’s productivity and bottom line.  “Nothing says, ‘We don’t appreciate you’ more than when your employee has worked like crazy to finish the project, and you reward them by adding more to their plate.”

5. FAVORITISM

When “who you know” becomes a blatant reason for advancement or preferential treatment, employees often find it tough to swallow this bitter pill.

6. OVERWORKED

The toll on overworked employees can include fatigue, irritability, weight gain, insomnia, and a whole host of other physical and mental ailments.

7. MICROMANAGEMENT

The micromanager shows little trust in employees and robs them of the ability to do their job. Micromanagers usually have an obsessive-compulsive behavior and fear if they don’t stay on top of an employee, then their job is on the line.

8. INCOMPETENT MANAGERS

There’s at least one in every company. The man or woman who people shake their head at and ask, “How in the world did they get that job?” 

9. NO OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT

It may be the simple fact that there are no positions to move up into. And if that drags on for years, it may be time to move on to another company or line of work.

10. OVERBEARING BOSS

Employees should take on bad boss behavior by one, making sure they’re doing things right; two, documenting bad behavior; three, finding a mentor within the company to confide in, and four, if all else fails, report the ogre to a supervisor or the human resources department.
Can Employees Trust Human Resources?

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